TWHS NEWS

A Week of Whale Strandings

Back to Article
Back to Article

A Week of Whale Strandings

Maya Konieczynski, Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The last week in November was a hard week for whales in New Zealand. On Saturday, 145 pilot whales stranded themselves on Stewart beach. Then two days later 10 pygmy whales were found stranded on Ninety Mile beach. Then sadly a day after the Ninety Mile beach stranding 27 pilot whales and one humpback whale humpback whale was discovered on a beach in the Victorian national park (The Advertiser).

“Sadly, the likelihood of being able to successfully re-float the remaining whales was extremely low,” stated Ren Leppens of the regional department of conservation in an interview with BBC. In the first beaching on Saturday half, the whales were already dead when the lone hiker discovered them but, the others had to be euthanized. Then in the incident on Monday on Ninety Mile Beach, four out of the 10 pygmy whales died to euthanasia while the other six were relocated and helped back out to sea. While in the stranding in the Victorian national park most of the whales were already dead upon discovery (The Advertiser).

New Zealand has one of the highest stranding rates in the world. On average there are about 300 dolphins and whales that strand themselves on the beaches of New Zealand. There are many reasons why whales will strand themselves. These reasons include navigational errors, social bonds, injury, or that they are old or sick. Whales and dolphins have a tendency to swim close to shore as a safety tool from predators such as Orcas. Whales beach themselves often in New Zealand because the coastline is right next to the deep waters. This makes some areas available to whales and dolphins to swim in during high tide but then leaves them trapped during low tide (Project Jonah).

Although many of the stated reason could have been a factor to why there were three group strandings in less than a week the department of conservation says that the most likely reason behind the stranding is that the whale’s echolocation isn’t very effective when it’s interfered with a man-made sonar. This then makes the whale go into a distressed state and affects their ability to find their way back to the deeper water (The Advertiser).

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • A Week of Whale Strandings

    Showcase

    Thomas Worthington Students and Staff Purchase Gifts for Children in Need

  • A Week of Whale Strandings

    Showcase

    Sea Turtle Populations Turning Female?

  • A Week of Whale Strandings

    Feature

    Bringing Back the Extinct

  • A Week of Whale Strandings

    News

    ABCs of Betrayal

  • A Week of Whale Strandings

    News

    Worthington Schools Levy and Bond Issue Sent to Ballot

  • A Week of Whale Strandings

    Showcase

    Football Friday Nights

  • A Week of Whale Strandings

    Videos

    “Central Office” Segment 2

  • A Week of Whale Strandings

    Videos

    “Central Office” Segment 1

  • A Week of Whale Strandings

    Culture

    Staying Safe at Prom

  • A Week of Whale Strandings

    Videos

    The Cardinal Report 5-5-17

Navigate Right